Jun 042013
 

Hamstring Exercises – Flexibility Through Workouts

Through recent studies, it has been found that many people in the United States have tight hamstrings. The hamstring is a very important muscle in the leg, and is almost always in constant use. If you are an athlete, someone who works on their feet, or does heavy lifting, then you frequently use your hamstrings to perform necessary functions. It is important for you to perform hamstring exercises. Hamstring exercises increase the flexibility of your hamstrings, making them stronger and allowing you to work more efficiently.

The following hamstring workouts are a good way to increase both the strength and flexibility of these important muscles.

hamstring excercises

 

Hamstring Exercises – Exercise One

These flexibility exercises are among many commonly used hamstring stretches that are employed by professional trainers, and often finds use in high school physical education programs. Given how common it is, it is the first one we cover.

1.  Sit on the floor, placing both of your legs straight out in front of you. There should be no empty space between your legs.

2. Reach out with both hands, bending forward at the waist, as far as possible while keeping your knees straight.

3. Hold the posture for ten seconds

4. Relax for three seconds, and then do steps one through four again.

You should probably do these hamstring exercises in sets of three or five to start, to make sure you get your body used to stretching. After a few weeks, you’ll be able to do these hamstring exercises in sets of ten to twenty.

Hamstring Exercises – Exercise Two

These stretching exercises are also among the popular hamstring exercises that are used in athletic programs and high school physical education classes. In physical education classes, it is common for instructors to have students perform these hamstring exercises after they do exercise one.

1.  Sit down on the floor and hold one let straight out.

2. Bend your other leg at your knee. Put the bottom of that foot against the inner thigh of the leg you are holding straight out.

3. Reach out with your arms toward the foot which you have sticking straight out, while bending at your waist as far as you can. Make sure to keep your knee straight.

4. Hold this posture for ten seconds.

5. Rest for three seconds, then do steps one through four again.

Like exercise one, when you start out doing these hamstring exercises, you should start out with three to five to get your body used to it. As your hamstrings get stronger, you can increase the number you do. When you do this exercise, you should alternate legs. That is, you should perform this exercise with the right leg sticking out, then do it with the left leg sticking out.

Hamstring Exercises – Exercise Three

These hamstring exercises are standing exercises that are not as commonly used as the sitting exercises mentioned earlier. However, some readers will probably recognize this exercise from their days in high school physical education class.

1. Stand up and cross one foot over the other one.

2. Bend your head toward your exposed knee as far as you can (the other knee should be “hidden” behind the other). Make sure to keep your knees straight.

3. Reach as far as you can and hold for ten seconds.

4. Relax for three seconds then perform steps one through three again.

With this exercise you should do one set with your right foot crossed over the left, and then another set with your left foot crossed over the right, making sure to alternate so both hamstrings get an equal workout.

Doing these exercises daily will make you a more productive athlete, worker, and feel better about doing anything on your feet. Also, doing hamstring exercises will make it less likely that your hamstrings will be sore after working on your feet for extended periods. Pick your favorite exercise or do them all, just remember not to overwork your hamstrings and work out the other muscles in your legs. I hope this gives you a good idea of differnet Hamstring Exercises.

 Posted by at 8:48 am

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